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Learner-Centered Curriculum: An Annotated Bibliography

Salas, A., & Moller, L. (2015). The value of Voice thread in online learning: Faculty perceptions of usefulness. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 16(1), 11-24.
In this article, the authors wanted to illustrate the contribution of society college faculty when it comes to the use of the voice thread. Online learning is perceived by the authors as essential tool in imparting knowledge to the scholars. Salas and Moller (2015) accept that the method should be employed by all educators to make their teaching successful.
A device which make the creation as well as sharing of the content coming from the multimedia has been used by the researchers in ensuring that the study gets appropriate output. Technology is employed in ensuring that students attain maximally from their studies. It is therefore essential to make technological devices to be up to date in ensuring that students reap from their efforts.
The article is essential since it makes it makes the readers to know the essence of online learning in learner-centered approach curriculum. It makes readers to be know the significant of technology in education. The article is similarly essential in ensuring that the educators employs all the resources when it comes to imparting knowledge.

Wals, A. E., Brody, M., Dillon, J., and Stevenson, R. B. (2014). Convergence between science and environmental education. Science, 344 (6184), 583-584.
Vital matters like loss of biodiversity, climate change, malnutrition, food scarcity are substantially multifaceted and disputed in both society and science. To tackle them, science educators and environmental educators ought to engage individuals in whatever is ordinarily known as challenges on sustainability.
Unfortunately, SE (science education) that majors basically on teaching skills and knowledge, and EE (environmental education) that similarly emphasizes on assimilation of values. Besides, it is similarly changing actions which have turn out to be increasingly secluded.
The association between EE and SE has been described to be “competitive, distant, competitive, host-parasite and predator-prey” (Wals et al., 2014). The authors examined potential in support of SE and EE convergence which can be used in involving people when it comes to addressing fundamental socio-ecological problems.
Abdelmalak, M., & Trespalacios, J. (2013). Using a learner-centered approach to develop an educational technology course. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 25(3), 324-332.
Within this qualitative research, the authors were having interest on ways in which students could respond to various concepts which they have learnt in class. The article used a course designed through learner-centered standards in preference to teacher-centered pedagogy.
The researchers were having major interest on courses for graduate educational technology that are being offered in U.S. College. The results showed that all learning technologies are beneficial to the students. It learner-centered approach is essential when developing curriculum standards.
In summary, learning technologies are essential in ensuring that the learners get what they study in all their courses. Technology is paramount for the success of any learning program.

Genk, M. (2015). The project-based learning approach in environmental education. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, 24(2), 105-117.
The principal aim of this research is to examine the effects of learning, which is project-based on attitudes of students towards an environment. Within the study that was carried out by 39 students who are taking “Environmental Education” course, changes in attitude to an environment were examined for scholars who came up with projects concerning environmental problems.
A mixed-method design was employed in fleshing out study the outcomes. After being informed about fundamental concepts of environment and learning that are project-based, students took part in group work in developing projects concerning environmental predicaments.
Students who took part in the study had a belief that the practice assisted them when it comes to defining environmental problems more clearly (Genk, 2015).

Dyson, B., Vickers, K., Turtle, J., Cowan, S. and Tisane, A. (2015). Evaluating the use of Face book to increase student engagement and understanding in lecture-based classes. In High Educe, 2015(69), 303–313.
The article emphasizes on challenges of employing popular social media mediums for teaching functions. Triumphant incorporation of social media into any teaching process is described by the authors as a challenging task (Dyson et al., 2015).
Besides, any relative failure or success of these involvements might fall or stand on the foundation of complex interactions.
The authors conclude that using established social media is essential in assisting learning process.
Symonds, M. (2014). Lecturing, and another face-to-face teaching –too much or too little? An assessment based on student feedback and fail rates. A Journal on Higher Education Research and Development, 33(6), 1221-1231.
The article presents a summary of denigrations of traditional lectures but similarly distinguishes the values such lecture methods could provide to students.
The author of the article notes that several lecturers and learners are contented with the traditional lecture methods.
The author warns against an attempt to exclusively give an online delivery of content, neglecting human contact which is greatly given preference by students (Symonds, 2014).

Abeysekera, L. and Dawson, P. (2015). Motivation and cognitive load in the flipped classroom: definition, rationale and a call for research. Higher Education Research and Development, 34(1), 1-14.
This is a very assistive explanation, and summary concerning the flipped learning together with its roles. The article identifies the possibility that there is insufficient proof in backing its roles.
The authors attempt to give theoretical proof to stand like an effectiveness flipped learning. The authors propose that flipped learning might lead to an augmented motivation and engagement of students. This is making their capability to learn deeply through flipped learning as compared to other learning approaches (Abeysekera and Dawson, 2015).
However, Abeysekera and Dawson (2014) provide a caution note which states that flipped learning might never often work. For that matter, it requires more research for its efficiency.

Sharples, M., Adams, A., Ferguson, R., Gaved, M., McAndrew, P., Rienties, B., Weller, M. and Whitelock, D. (2014). Open University Innovation Report 3: Innovating Pedagogy Exploring new forms of teaching, learning and assessment, to guide educators and policy makers. Milton Keynes: The Open University.
The article attempts to blend learning outside and inside the classrooms, which an essential exploration and explanation of the potential advantages as well as concernsabout flipped learning. The article similarly looked into the roles of students’ personal mobile technologies within the classroom surroundings.
The article also outlines the challenges andbenefits of flipped learning concerning the classroom accessibility and management for all students for every student having a similar technology level (Sharples et al., 2014). The authors encourage the students to bring their person devices so as to make learning to be easy.
Learners are supposed to utilize their personal devices towards enhancing learning process within their classrooms or outside their classroom. It is therefore essential in ensuring that learners make use of appropriate measures in ensuring that learners take follows appropriate curriculum in their educational standards.

Petrovic, J., and Pale, P. (2014). Students’ perception of live lectures’ inherent disadvantages. Teaching in Higher Education, 20(2), 143–157.
The authors of this article found out that 77% of scholars infrequently or never employ their capability of posing a question to their lecturers when being taught.
Besides, 40% of students never using their ability towards discussing lectures’ content with their fellow students in the period of their lecture breaks. This is coming as a result that these students are regularly having myriad misunderstandings towards participating in such discussions (Petrovic and Pale, 2014).
At times, the students are assumed to be having a short cognitive break. Finally, the article similarly gives backing in support of the utilization of lecture capture as well as a proof showing that students are valuing the classes as a measure of giving out essential information concerning the course they are pursuing.

Gilhooly, D., & Lee, E. (2014). The role of digital literacy practices on refugee resettlement. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 57, 387–396.
The article investigates the practices of digital literacy in three major Karen immigrant students that came from Burma but opted to settle within the rural Georgia area. The authors have employed mutual participant observation and ethnography in documenting and analyzing ways in which digital literacy permitted those scholars towards surviving within the life in the area. Their life survival techniques made them thrive throughout their resettlement duration (Gilhooly and Lee, 2014).
From the article, the data analysis shows that participants employed digital media towards maintaining and building interethnic comradeships. Through digital media, they were able to relate well with the entire Karen Diaspora society, maintain as well as promote racial unity alongside creating and disseminating digital construction.
The authors conclude by highlighting possibilities on the importance of learning through internet as well as other digital media platforms that are meant for offering immigrant scholars with the means towards expressing and exploring their heritage themselves together with their host society.

Hull, G.and Stornaiuolo, A. (2014). Cosmopolitan literacy’s, social networks, and “proper distance”: Striving to understand in a global world. Curriculum Inquiry, 45(1), 15–44.
The article investigates semiotic activities of two major factions, adolescents within New York and India. The two regions are made up of multimodal artifacts. The authors give Introduction to the theory of cosmopolitan literacy towards comprehending how racial aspects of authorship across diversities interlink with aesthetic, cognitive as well as emotional meaning-making capabilities.
The article establishes that participants adopted three rhetorical positions— reciprocal, proximal and reflexive. This happened as they as they were believed to be distant people and determined whatever their people required.
Hull and Stornaiuolo (2014) portends that the mentioned three stands typify a shift within the approaches audience required to be taken within global communicative contexts where a primary function is to employ as well as interact well others for better association.

WestEd. (2014). Academy Breaks the Isolation of Special Education Directors. Research and Development Alert, 14(3), 14-17. Retrieved from http://www.wested.org/wpcontent/files_mf/1390507442article_AcademyBreaksIsolation_RD143.pdf
The article delves on the association between the directors of special education and their counterparts in the general education segment. This is meant to enhance comprehensive learning like a crucial goal for Special Education Leadership Academy.
The article which has been funded by MADESE, the Academy targets towards constructing the capacities of director towards doing their jobs efficiently and minimizing burnout.
WestEd. (2014) adds value to literature which is handling special education. This is done by highlighting appropriate approaches towards bridging gaps between experts in general and special education special.

Clarke, L.M., DePiper, J.N., Frank, T.J., Nishio, M., Campbell, P.F., Smith, T.M., Griffin, M.J., and Choi, Y. (2014). Teacher Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Teachers’ Beliefs and Awareness of Their Students’ Mathematical Dispositions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 45 (2), 246-284.
The authors of this paper emphasizes on the association between being aware of the dispositions of students in mathematics. A known belief that scholars are supposed to struggle and teachers are supposed to model in support of increasing the mastery of students’ incremental mastery.
Permitting scholars to put greater effort is linked to the understanding of a teacher handling mathematics. The research similarly looked into ways in which teacher education impacts on various beliefs that the students are having during their lessons. The study similarly outlines how the students’ behaviour influence their achievement at the end of studies (Clarke et al., 2014).
The study also delves on teachers’ personal experiences. Personal experiences of teachers are having essential impacts on the students’ beliefs as well as their education. The study concluded that programs for teacher education are supposed to add clear ways in which teacher candidates could employ in formulating their beliefs.

DeJarnette, A. F., Dao, J. N., & Gonzalez, G. (2014). Learning What Works: Promoting Small Group Discussions. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 19(7), 414-419.  Retrieved from http://www.nctm.org/publications/article.aspx?id=41260
The article talks about students in middle school who are tied up in groups to operate on the proportion of change problem. The authors indicated that the conducts of the teams were productive and assistive to the students.
Through observing the groups, the researchers devised three major strategies that might at times enhance productive mathematical conversation amongst the scholars that are taking their groups seriously. The strategies assisted the researchers in ensuring that appropriate measures are made in coming up with ways of developing the curriculum.
The researchers also provided an insight with regard to why students might struggle asking questions to one another in their groups (DeJarnette, Dao and Gonzalez, 2014). The article is essential as it presents items which teachers are able to do in supporting student’s collaboration. The article is essential in devising apt measures for curriculum development.

Jocson, K. (2015). New media literacy as social action: The centrality of pedagogy in the politics of knowledge production. Curriculum Inquiry, 45, 30–51.
The paper uses practices and perspectives of fresh media literacy towards assessing blotching lines of youth educational participatory and production politics.
The article similarly uses approaches of both participatory action and design-based research through carrying out cyclical and iterative analytical techniques in the period of course for a semester (Jocson, 2015). This is focusing on the on the fresh media literacy as well as popular culture within an urban education.
Similarly, the article gives a description on ways in which media literacy doubles as essential social skills as well as cultural competencies when it comes to video production. It winds up by essential note that the literacy on new media are vital practices in participatory politics and cultural production for the youth.

Haugsbakken, H., & Langseth, I. (2014). YouTubing: Challenging traditional literacy and encouraging self-organization and connecting in a connectivity approach to learning in the K–12 systems. Digital Culture & Education, 6(2), 133–151.
The article employs qualitative research approaches towards broadening linguistic literacy scope so as to incorporate literacy on audio-visual. Haugsbakken and Langseth (2014) throughout the article showed the importance of you tube in passing educational messages. You tube makes gives essential ways in which the message is passed from one person to another.
It also gives an analysis of connectivity method corresponding to adolescents, YouTube videos as well as digital learning. The article similarly assesses the ways in which the students of English used content taken from YouTube videos in their process of audio-visual text and crossing written boundaries towards supporting writing and oral discussion.
The authors of the article wrap up by saying that YouTube should be engaged in formal and informal literacy education via social organization of students (Haugsbakken and Langseth, 2014). Therefore, you tube should be employed so as to make effective dissemination of information from one person to another.
Siu, C. K. (2014). Developing information literacy and critical thinking skills through domain knowledge learning in digital classrooms: An experience of practicing flipped classroom strategy. Computers & Education, 78, 160–173.
Siu (2014) looks into impacts of 13-week experience by the students on a digital classroom growth. Digital classroom growth is essential in making the work simpler for the educators. Thus, digital classroom growth promotes effectiveness in ensuring that effective learning is promoted in all the schools.
The authors employ pre- and post-tests for the field acquaintance, literacy on a piece of information, surveys, essential thinking tests as well as interviews that are semi-structured having students and teachers and students.
The article is excellent since it gives appropriate information on how to handle information literacy of the students. It similarly shows the significant of digital class room growth. It promotes good learner-centered through the use of technology.

Thomas, P. (2014). A case study of using a hypermedia pedagogy in a secondary English classroom. English in Australia, 49(1), 53–61.
The article investigates the impacts of hypermedia story production when it comes to teaching narratives for the students in middle school. Hypermedia is essential device for all centers of learning. Thus, the author looks into various ways in which hypermedia could be used in ensuring that appropriate education is attained.
The article employs case study and action research methodologies in exploring hypermedia like a new literacy in the digital era (Thomas, 2014). The findings of the paper states that are adolescents are seen to be vigorously engaged scholars across operational, artistic, and essential facets of literacy in the environments of hypermedia story.
In the conclusion, hypermedia possesses prospective in support of engaging scholars that are having complexities having operational facets of literacy print-based as well as well as serving as other forms of “literacy” construction upon conventional textual literacy.

References
Abdelmalak, M., & Trespalacios, J. (2014). Using a learner-centered approach to develop an educational technology course. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 25(3), 324-332.
Abeysekera, L. and Dawson, P. (2015). Motivation and cognitive load in the flipped classroom: definition, rationale and a call for research. Higher Education Research and Development, 34(1), 1-14.
Clarke, L.M., DePiper, J.N., Frank, T.J., Nishio, M., Campbell, P.F., Smith, T.M., Griffin, M.J., Choi, Y. (2014). Teacher Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Teachers’ Beliefs and Awareness of Their Students’ Mathematical Dispositions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 45(2), 246-284.
DeJarnette, A. F., Dao, J. N., & Gonzalez, G. (2014). Learning What Works: Promoting Small Group Discussions. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 19(7), 414-419.  Retrieved from http://www.nctm.org/publications/article.aspx?id=41260
Dyson, B., Vickers, K., Turtle, J., Cowan, S. and Tassone, A. (2015). Evaluating the use of Face book to increase student engagement and understanding in lecture-based classes. In High Education, 2015(69), 303–313.
Genc, M. (2015). The project-based learning approach in environmental education. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, 24(2), 105-117.
Gilhooly, D., & Lee, E. (2014). The role of digital literacy practices on refugee resettlement. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 57,387–396.
Haugsbakken, H., & Langseth, I. (2014). YouTubing: Challenging traditional literacy and encouraging self-organization and connecting in a connectivity approach to learning in the K–12 system. Digital Culture & Education, 6(2), 133–151.
Hull, G. and Stornaiuolo, A. (2014). Cosmopolitan literacy’s, social networks, and “proper distance”: striving to understand in a global world. Curriculum Inquiry, 45(1), 15–44.
Jocson, K. (2015). New media literacy as social action: The centrality of pedagogy in the politics of knowledge production. Curriculum Inquiry, 45, 30–51.
Petrovic, J., and Pale, P. (2014). Students’ perception of live lectures’ inherent disadvantages. Teaching in Higher Education, 20(2), 143–157.
Salas, A., & Moller, L. (2015). The value of Voice thread in online learning: Faculty perceptions of usefulness. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 16(1), 11-24.
Sharples, M., Adams, A., Ferguson, R., Gaved, M., McAndrew, P., Rienties, B., Weller, M. and Whitelock, D. (2014). Open University Innovation Report 3: Innovating Pedagogy Exploring new forms of teaching, learning and assessment, to guide educators and policy makers. Milton Keynes: The Open University.
Siu, C. K. (2014). Developing information literacy and critical thinking skills through domain knowledge learning in digital classrooms: An experience of practicing flipped classroom strategy. Computers & Education, 78, 160–173.
Symonds, M. (2014). Lecturing, and another face-to-face teaching –too much or too little? An assessment based on student feedback and fail rates. A Journal on Higher Education Research and Development, 33(6), 1221-1231.
Thomas, P. (2014). A case study of using a hypermedia pedagogy in a secondary English classroom. English in Australia, 49 (1), 53–61.
Wals, A. E., Brody, M., Dillon, J., and Stevenson, R. B. (2014). Convergence between science and environmental education. Science, 344(6184), 583-584.
WestEd. (2014). Academy Breaks the Isolation of Special Education Directors. R&D Alert, 14 (3), 14-¬17. San Francisco: WestEd. Retrieved from http://www.wested.org/wpcontent/files_mf/1390507442article_AcademyBreaksIsolation_RD143.pdf

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